Scientists observe supermassive black hole in infant universe

Astronomers Find the Earliest Supermassive Black Hole Ever Discovered

Astronomers Find the Earliest Supermassive Black Hole Ever Discovered

The researchers also show that the black hole already weighed a hard-to-explain 780 million times the mass of the sun.

A high redshift indicates great distance, and as light takes its sweet time getting to Earth from elsewhere in space (at 186,000 miles per second), science can use this to gauge how far back in time we're seeing something. In an email to MACH, she said she and the others have argued that, rather than being only about 100 to 1,000 times as massive as the sun, some black hole seeds must have been 10,000 to 100,000 times more massive.

The researchers have detected the most distant supermassive black hole ever observed. "Gathering all this mass in fewer than 690 million years is an enormous challenge for theories of supermassive black hole growth".

A huge black hole has just been discovered that is about 13 billion light-years old - nearly as old as the universe itself. "But it's pretty hard to get that kind of a mass that early in the universe".

Mueller's Russian Federation probe has cost millions - DOJ
The heat on the investigation of President Trump's finances has just been cranked up even further. Those trades are being investigated in multiple probes in the U.S. and Europe.

"What we have found is that the universe was about 50/50 - it's a moment when the first galaxies emerged from their cocoons of neutral gas and started to shine their way out", says MIT's Robert Simcoe, co-author of the study.

Then gravity began to squash down matter into the first stars and galaxies, then creating light in the form of photons. And it is so far away that we are seeing something that formed when the universe was only five per cent of its current age - something that scientists say shouldn't be able to happen. And how did those behemoth black holes grow so big in so little time? The black hole sits in the center of an ultrabright quasar, the light of which was emitted just 690 million years after the Big Bang. Scientists have now found a super-sized black hole. As more stars and galaxies formed, they eventually generated enough radiation to flip hydrogen from neutral, a state in which hydrogen's electrons are bound to their nucleus, to ionized, in which the electrons are set free to recombine at random. As more stars formed from the remains of first-generation stars, they became "polluted" with heavier elements and in turn produce even heavier elements when they explode in supernovae. It dates back to 690 million years after the Big Bang.

The newly identified quasar appears to inhabit a pivotal moment in the universe's history. During its early stage, the universe went through what is sometimes called the Dark Age - not a metaphor, as it is for the human period, but a truly a dark age as there was no light.

Astronomers have at least two gnawing questions about the first billion years of the universe, an era steeped in literal fog and figurative mystery. That means that the black hole quasar was formed exactly during that reionization phase after the Big Bang event. That indicated to researchers that the stars were just beginning to glow, he said.

Recommended News

We are pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news.
Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper.
Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.