Reduced Alcohol Intake May Prevent The Chances of Developing Cancer

Fans will be able to buy beer or wine at men's hockey games at St. Cloud State this year

Fans will be able to buy beer or wine at men's hockey games at St. Cloud State this year

Drinking even one alcoholic drink per day is linked with a 5 percent increase in the risk of breast cancer, a 17 percent increase in the risk of oropharyngeal cancer (a cancer of the middle part of the throat) and a 30 percent increase in the risk of esophageal cancer, compared with not drinking, according to a 2013 study cited by the ASCO statement.

For its research, ASCO reviewed earlier studied and made the conclusion that 5.5% of all of the new cancers as well as 5.8% of cancer deaths around the world could be attributed to alcohol.

Researchers found that light drinking was associated with a 13 per cent increase in head and neck cancer, and a four per cent increase in breast cancer. Fewer than one in three adults identified alcohol as a risk factor for cancer. However, the risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, oropharyngeal and breast cancer were elevated even among light drinkers (one or fewer drinks per day).

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"ASCO believes that a proactive stance by the Society to minimize excessive exposure to alcohol has important implications for cancer prevention", the statement, which was published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, said. "If you drink more, drinking less will definitely reduce your risk", she says. "The good news is that, just like people wear sunscreen to limit their risk of skin cancer, limiting alcohol intake is one more thing people can do to reduce their overall risk of developing cancer".

"The message is not, 'Don't drink.' It's, 'If you want to reduce your cancer risk, drink less", said Dr. Noelle LoConte, lead author of the statement. "Therefore, limiting alcohol intake is a means to prevent cancer". "We don't have randomized trials, but sometimes when you start looking at the coherence of all the evidence, including the observational epidemiology, the lab studies, the mechanistic studies, you begin to see a picture and get more clarity". Further researchers propounded in 2012 that almost 5.5 percent all novel cancer contingency and 5.8 percent of all cancer related demise worldwide could be assigned to consuming alcohol. "It is really the heavy drinkers over a long period of time that we need to worry about", she said.

"However, the link between increased alcohol consumption and cancer has been firmly established", Johnson said.

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